Just Jo

Every writer has that character, that one they encountered somewhere within the pages of another writer’s work and said “Ah-ha! I have found my literary twin.”

I was talking about this with a writing friend recently, and I’ve decided to introduce you all to my literary twin: Jo March. Perhaps you’ve heard of her. 😉 Created by Louisa May Alcott, she is featured in the literary classic, Little Women.

What is it about her I connect with so deeply? I didn’t grow up with a cohort of sisters. My father didn’t go off to war. There was no mysterious boy living next door to me. And I certainly never harbored a deep desire to live in the time of hoop skirts and corsets. I’m happy to live in a vastly different world from Jo March.

It isn’t her situation that resonates with me. It’s her personality. (more…)

the real story

We’ve all been there. In a high school classroom, talking about some piece of classic literature, dissecting the themes and literary devices.

But sometimes it’s not that complicated. Want the real story? Here’s what those stories/plays were really saying.

Romeo & Juliet: Attention to details really could save your life. (Along with learning how to check a pulse.)

The Scarlet Letter: People talk about other people because they’re bored with their own lives. Be boring and no one will talk. (more…)

the heart of the story

He’s one of the best supporting characters in literature. He bumbles right into the story, seemingly by accident and becomes one of the hero’s greatest allies.

I am, of course, talking about none other than Samwise Gamgee.

My husband and I have been rewatching our LotR movies in preparation for The Hobbit (and no, before you think it, let me assure you we’re not the people who dress up in weird costumes to see a movie). I think the sign of a great movie/story is that every time I watch it, something new strikes me. (more…)