Agatha Said, pt. 10

It’s time for another Agatha Day! Usually this day falls on the first Wednesday of the month, but I pushed it a day due to the Vice Presidential debate. (On that note, please vote. I’m sure you’ve been seeing that reminder everywhere, but it’s so important. You have a voice. Don’t let anyone muffle it.)

In other news, the weather here in VA has turned beautifully crisp and I’m loving it. And while I love to write in every season, fall is my absolute favorite and seems to stir up extra creativity in me. While spring might be the season that represents new beginnings to most people, for me, it’s fall. And so today I’m sharing a quote that represents the beginning of something incredible for our dear Agatha Christie.

Agatha Said:

“Fired with all this [discussion of detective stories], I said I should like to try my hand at a detective story.

“‘I don’t think you could do it,’ said Madge. ‘They are very difficult to do. I’ve thought about it.’

“‘I should like to try.’

“‘Well, I bet you couldn’t,’ said Madge.

“There the matter rested. It was never a definite bet; we never set out terms — but the words had been said. From that moment I was fired by the determination that I would write a detective story. It didn’t go further than that. I didn’t start to write it then, or plan it out; the seed had been sown. At the back of my mind, where the stories of the books I am going to write take their place long before the germination of the seed occurs, the idea had been planted: some day I would write a detective story.

The Context: Agatha is talking about her childhood and how her older sister, Madge, introduced her to detective stories through the tales of Sherlock Holmes, followed by The Leavenworth Case when Agatha was eight. She talks about how they used to love discussing their favorite mystery stories, and that memory leads into the statement that opens the quotation.

Why I Chose It: Everyone wants to know where the greats in every field began. When was the moment they decided to pursue that dream? And here we get a glimpse at it. Young Agatha, when talking about the detective stories she so deeply loves, wonders if she can write one. She’s immediately met with discouragement from her sister, which likely only strengthened her resolve. As Agatha points out, she didn’t start right then, but the seed was planted. The idea was there, and over the years, it would grow.

As they did for Agatha, the seeds of my own ideas and choices are planted long before they become anything. Some seeds just die in the dirt like some of my houseplants. Others lie dormant until one day they burst to life. Sometimes I don’t recognize the moment a seed is planted until the plant begins to grow and I trace its roots back to their origin. Sometimes the moment seems so insignificant and small, like this conversation Agatha had with her sister. It’s funny to read that conversation with the knowledge of the mystery legend Agatha Christie became.

Who knows what seeds might be within you, waiting for their chance to break through the surface? Who knows what seeds of ideas and inspiration you may plant in the hearts of others?

Agatha Said, pt. 9

We’re now easing our way into September (a celebration for those of us who love fall; my sympathies to anyone who adores summer), which means it’s time for another Agatha Day! This one is all about how her murder-y writer’s mind worked.

Agatha Said:

“Plots come to me at such odd moments: when I am walking along a street, or examining a hat-shop with particular interest, suddenly a splendid idea comes into my head, and I think, ‘Now that would be a neat way of covering up the crime so that nobody would see the point.’ Of course, all the practical details are still to be worked out, and the people have to creep slowly into my consciousness, but I jot down my splendid idea in an exercise book.”

Context: In this section, Agatha is reflecting on the creation of Miss Marple, her second significant detective hero. She lists various Marple mysteries, along with some of her other books. Then she mentions Peril at End House, acknowledging that it left so little an impression on her that she has no recollection of even writing it. She admits it’s possible she thought of the plot long before she wrote it, which she says is a habit a of hers. That leads into this specific quote.

Why I Chose It: Quite simply, I relate to this quote so much. Sometimes I think I’m fully engaged with what I’m doing—washing dishes, for instance—and the next thing I know, I’ve created a full murder plot centering on a chipped dinner plate.

For creative people, inspiration is everywhere. I never know what will be the spark that will set my imagination ablaze, engulfed in flames of creative ideas. Sometimes it’s remarkably inconvenient. It’s difficult to explain to your dinner companions (back when I used to hang out with people in person) why you’re suddenly staring off in the distance with a sadistic smile. But I’m fortunate to have some incredible friends who know my creative side and happily engage with my brainstorming. (My sister-in-law even volunteered to play a corpse once so I could try dragging her along the beach.)

And also like Agatha, I often end up with ideas dwelling and growing within my mind for so long that I can’t even trace the source of them. Some of my manuscripts are linked to specific, striking moments of “What if…”, while others are based on ideas with origins I can’t specifically recall. And like Agatha and so many other writers, I try to capture those ephemeral ideas by scrawling phrases in various notebooks. Maybe I’ll come back to them one day. Maybe they’ll stagnate and fade into unused potential. Maybe I’ll read a line and have no idea what on earth I was talking about.

What matters is that I embrace the ideas when they come and chase them down, sometimes completely surprised by where I end up. It’s encouraging and humbling to know I share that trait with such a literary giant in the world of mystery.

Agatha Said, pt. 8

Happy Agatha Day! This month’s quote talks about some characteristics that are just as important now as they were in Agatha Christie’s day.

Agatha Said:

“I think I admire loyalty almost more than any other virtue. Loyalty and courage are two of the finest things there are. Any kind of courage, physical or moral, arouses my utmost admiration. It is one of the most important virtues to bring to life. If you can bear to live at all, you can bear to live with courage. It is a must.”

Context: This quote lies toward the beginning of a passage where Agatha is writing about life after her divorce. She and her daughter’s nanny quite amusingly divided Agatha’s friends into two categories: the Order of the Rats and the Order of the Faithful Dogs. Agatha admits that there were quite a few people she thought would be in one category who showed themselves to belong squarely in the other. That leads into this quote.

Why I Chose It: Because of what Agatha went through with her very dramatic divorce, she realized some friends were not really friends at all. But it helped her identify her true friends and value them even more, and to identify acquaintances who were proving themselves to be true supporters. The fact that Agatha considered loyalty and courage the most important virtues to possess is particularly revealing. I think you can learn a lot about a person based on what they value in the people around them.

Loyalty and courage are still incredibly powerful and pertinent virtues to have today. On their own, each is a positive trait, but when they are paired together, they can produce a powerful ally, advocate, and friend. May we all strive to be people of great loyalty and courage, now more than ever.

Agatha Said, pt. 7

Happy Agatha Day! It feels a little like we’re in a strange, alternate world right now, doesn’t it? I hope you’re all hanging in there and treating yourselves well. This month’s Agatha quote feels especially appropriate for this time.

Agatha Said:

“Life is really like a ship — the interior of a ship, that is. It has watertight compartments. You emerge from one, seal and bolt the doors, and find yourself in another. My life from the day we left Southampton to the day we returned to England was one such compartment. Ever since that I have felt the same about travel. You step from one life into another. You are yourself, but a different self.”

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Agatha Said, pt. 6

Happy Agatha Day! We have made it through March, although it sure seemed to last forever. I thought about skipping a quote this month, but then I remembered that Agatha had some things to say about the state of the world that are perfect for what we’re all going through right now. It’s a longer quote, but it’s absolutely worth a read.

Agatha Said:

“There is at least the dawn, I believe, of a kind of good will. We mind when we hear of earthquakes, of spectacular disasters to the human race. We want to help. That is a real achievement; which I think must lead somewhere. Not quickly — nothing happens quickly — but at any rate we can hope. I think sometimes we do not appreciate that second virtue which we mention so seldom in the trilogy — faith, hope and charity. Faith we have had, shall we say, almost too much of — faith can make you bitter, hard, unforgiving; you can abuse faith. Love we cannot but help knowing in our own hearts is the essential. But how often do we forget that there is hope as well, and that we seldom think about hope? We are ready to despair too soon, we are ready to say, ‘What’s the good of doing anything?’ Hope is the virtue we should cultivate most in this present day and age.”

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