Agatha Said, pt. 8

Happy Agatha Day! This month’s quote talks about some characteristics that are just as important now as they were in Agatha Christie’s day.

Agatha Said:

“I think I admire loyalty almost more than any other virtue. Loyalty and courage are two of the finest things there are. Any kind of courage, physical or moral, arouses my utmost admiration. It is one of the most important virtues to bring to life. If you can bear to live at all, you can bear to live with courage. It is a must.”

Context: This quote lies toward the beginning of a passage where Agatha is writing about life after her divorce. She and her daughter’s nanny quite amusingly divided Agatha’s friends into two categories: the Order of the Rats and the Order of the Faithful Dogs. Agatha admits that there were quite a few people she thought would be in one category who showed themselves to belong squarely in the other. That leads into this quote.

Why I Chose It: Because of what Agatha went through with her very dramatic divorce, she realized some friends were not really friends at all. But it helped her identify her true friends and value them even more, and to identify acquaintances who were proving themselves to be true supporters. The fact that Agatha considered loyalty and courage the most important virtues to possess is particularly revealing. I think you can learn a lot about a person based on what they value in the people around them.

Loyalty and courage are still incredibly powerful and pertinent virtues to have today. On their own, each is a positive trait, but when they are paired together, they can produce a powerful ally, advocate, and friend. May we all strive to be people of great loyalty and courage, now more than ever.

Agatha Said, pt. 7

Happy Agatha Day! It feels a little like we’re in a strange, alternate world right now, doesn’t it? I hope you’re all hanging in there and treating yourselves well. This month’s Agatha quote feels especially appropriate for this time.

Agatha Said:

“Life is really like a ship — the interior of a ship, that is. It has watertight compartments. You emerge from one, seal and bolt the doors, and find yourself in another. My life from the day we left Southampton to the day we returned to England was one such compartment. Ever since that I have felt the same about travel. You step from one life into another. You are yourself, but a different self.”

Context: This paragraph opens a new section where Agatha is talking about how it felt to return from an exciting but grueling international tour for her first husband’s job. She muses about how strange it can feel to return from such a trip, how foreign your old life can seem after such a long period of being abroad.

Why I Chose It: For me, it really does capture what it’s like to go through something and then “return” to your previous life. You’re not the same person. It has echoes of the title of the Thomas Wolfe book, You Can’t Go Home Again. And while Agatha was referring to traveling, it’s so applicable to any life journey. When you go through something, it changes you, shaping you into a modified version of the person you were. As she says, “You are yourself, but a different self.”

We’re all going through something major right now, and we’ll come out of it changed. For some people, it will be in minor ways, and for others, they will feel like they have become entirely different people. But what I find especially hopefully is that through implies movement, forward progress. Eventually we will arrive somewhere else. One day, we’ll emerge from this compartment, and we’ll seal the door behind us, moving forward as different selves. Until then, hold onto the hope of that day with as much strength as you can summon and be kind to yourself and to each other.